Mudhead Kachina – Edmond Nequatewa – Hopi

$400.00

This Vintage Mudhead Kachina was created by the very famous Edmond Nequatewa. It is 8 1/2″ tall and signed by Edmond, who was Hopi. Nequatewa married June (Dawahonka) and had three sons: Douglas (Tateekinve), Jack (Boosna), and Neilson (Tawakuku). The two eldest boys subsequently died at the Phoenix Indian School, so Nequatewa and his wife moved to Flagstaff so their youngest son could attend a public school. Nequatewa became one of many Hopi employees at the Museum of Northern Arizona (MNA). He established a close relationship with MNA over the years and authored many books on the subjects of Hopi history, myths, and spiritualism. His portrait was painted by Mary Russell Ferrell Colton in the 1940s and is a part of the MNA fine art collection. He was born on 2nd Mesa on the Hopi reservation into a family of hereditary chiefs, the Sun Forehead Clan.
When Nequatewa was about 60 when he separated from June and married a Hopi woman from Hotevilla named Jean. They had 8 children. He was born on July 5, 1877 and passed away on April 28, 1969 after a long illness. Nequatewa’s childhood is detailed in his autobiography, “Born a Chief: the nineteenth century Hopi boyhood of Edmund Nequatewa”. This came from an estate sale of an avid collector.

Description

This Vintage Mudhead Kachina was created by the very famous Edmond Nequatewa. It is 8 1/2″ tall and signed by Edmond, who was Hopi. Nequatewa married June (Dawahonka) and had three sons: Douglas (Tateekinve), Jack (Boosna), and Neilson (Tawakuku). The two eldest boys subsequently died at the Phoenix Indian School, so Nequatewa and his wife moved to Flagstaff so their youngest son could attend a public school. Nequatewa became one of many Hopi employees at the Museum of Northern Arizona (MNA). He established a close relationship with MNA over the years and authored many books on the subjects of Hopi history, myths, and spiritualism. His portrait was painted by Mary Russell Ferrell Colton in the 1940s and is a part of the MNA fine art collection. He was born on 2nd Mesa on the Hopi reservation into a family of hereditary chiefs, the Sun Forehead Clan.
When Nequatewa was about 60 when he separated from June and married a Hopi woman from Hotevilla named Jean. They had 8 children. He was born on July 5, 1877 and passed away on April 28, 1969 after a long illness. Nequatewa’s childhood is detailed in his autobiography, “Born a Chief: the nineteenth century Hopi boyhood of Edmund Nequatewa”. This came from an estate sale of an avid collector.